Apr 28 EMSI Newsletter

Please see below for the latest EMSI/Huntington newsletter.  Lots of opportunities in this one!  Of special note:

  • May 16-17:  Revisiting Revisionism: New Directions in Early Modern British Studies (Huntington Conference)
  • Apr 30: CRASSH Postdoctoral Fellowship Application due: “Genius Before Romanticism: Ingenuity in Early Modern Art and Science”
  • May 30-31: WMQ-EMSI Workshop: The Age of Revolutions

 

Friday, May 2, 2014
Long 18th Century

Harriet Guest
University of York

“Sociability and Social Class: Seaside Holidays in 18th-Century Literature”

Huntington Library
Munger Research Library, Seaver 1 & 2
1151 Oxford Road, San Marino CA 91108
10am to 12pm (coffee served at 9:30am)

For more information on Long 18th Century seminars, please contact Emily Anderson (ehanders@usc.edu) or Felicity Nussbaum (nussbaum@humnet.ucla.edu).

Friday, May 2, 2014
Past Tense

Frederick E. Hoxie
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

“Will People Read About What They Don’t Already
Know?”

Please fill out the rsvp form in order to be included in the head count for lunch and to receive pre-circulated readings.

Huntington Library
Munger Research Library, Seaver 3
1151 Oxford Road, San Marino CA 91108
11:45am to 1pm

For more information on Past Tense seminars, please contact Adam Arenson (aiarenson@utep.edu).

Friday, May 2, 2014
Music Series

Adriano Banchieri, La Pazzia Senile (1598) (“The Crazy Old Fool”)

Thornton Baroque Sinfonia, directed by Adam Knight Gilbert

USC, University Park Campus
Alfred Newman Recital Hall
8pm

For more information on Music Series events, please contact Adam Knight Gilbert (adam.gilbert@usc.edu).

Friday, May 16, and Saturday, May 17, 2014
Huntington Conference

Revisiting Revisionism: New Directions in Early Modern British Studies

In the 1970’s, historical “Revisionism” upended scholarly notions about politics, parliaments, and
people. This conference reconsiders Revisionism’s impact on our understanding of early modern British history, religion, and literature, as well as on the “big issues”-reformation, revolution, class, culture- that have always animated British Studies.

Revisiting Revisionism

Seating for this event is limited, so please register as soon as possible.

For more information about this event, please email researchconference@huntington.org or call 626-405- 3432.

Huntington Library
Brody Botanical Center, Ahmanson Room
1151 Oxford Road, San Marino CA 91108
9:30am to 5pm (coffee at 8:30am)

This conference is co-sponsored by the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute and the Huntington’s Dorothy Collins Brown Endowment.

Friday, May 30, and Saturday, May 31, 2014
WMQ-EMSI Workshop

The Age of Revolutions

This workshop will focus on new research and innovative historical approaches to the “Age of Revolutions,” a field that largely began in the mid-twentieth century with the germinal work of Jacques Godechot and R. R. Palmer. As more eighteenth-century historians have taken the “transnational turn,” they have raised fresh questions: about, for example, the nature of imperial sovereignty, the importance of Haiti, the connections between revolution and slave emancipation, the relationship between violence and revolution, and the nature of subjectivities and personal identities amidst transnational turmoil.

Registration is limited; requests for registration and access to the workshop papers should be sent to Kelly Crawford (kscraw@wm.edu)

Huntington Library
Brody Botanical Center, Ahmanson Room
1151 Oxford Road, San Marino CA 91108
9:30am to 5pm (coffee at 9:00am)

This conference is co-sponsored by the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute and the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.

Wednesday, April 30, 2014
CRASSH Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

“Genius Before Romanticism: Ingenuity in Early Modern Art and Science”

The Centre for Research in Art, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH) at Cambridge University seeks applications for a 4.5-year Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, beginning in late-2014 and continuing no later than 2019.

What existed in the European imagination before the Romantic concept of ‘genius’? This five-year project will examine notions of unique talent, heightened imagination and extraordinary creativity in art and science by exploring the language, theories, practices and products of ingenium (ingenuity) ca. 1450-ca. 1750. Drawing on the perspectives of history of art, history of science, technology and medicine, intellectual history and literary studies, the project seeks to capture ingenuity across and between disciplines. Studying six countries (France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, England and Spain) across three centuries, it will trace ingenuity’s shifting patterns and fragmented fortunes over the longue durée.

Further Information

Please submit a cover letter, c.v., a monograph proposal, writing sample, a completed CHRIS 6 form (Parts 1 & 3 only), and the names and contact information of two references to the online application portal beginning April 1, 2014 and no later than Wednesday, April 30, 2014.

For more information about this fellowship, please contact Dr. Alexander Marr (ajm300@cam.ac.uk). For questions about the application process, please contact Catherine Hurley (ch335@cam.ac.uk).

Fall 2014
USC-UCLA Graduate Seminar

Political Opposition in Early Modern Europe & the Turn Toward Modernity

A joint seminar convened by Jacob Soll (USC) and Margaret Jacob (UCLA).

We aim to explore opposition movements from the Italian city-states of the 16th century to the absolute monarchies of the 18th century, also with attention to developments in England and the Dutch Republic. Finally, we intend to foucs on the opposition to the first successful opposition movement, the reaction to the French Revolution, and the emergence of right wing, and extreme right, politics during the 1790s and beyond.

Course_flyer

William Andrews Clark Memorial Library
Tuesdays, 2pm to 5pm

This graduate seminar is hosted by both USC and UCLA and gives credits in both.  Transportation to the Clark Library will be provided.  For more information, please contact Jacob Soll (soll@usc.edu) or Margaret Jacob (mjacob@history.ucla).

——

USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute
3502 Trousdale Parkway
SOS 153, MC 0034
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0034
email: emsi@dornsife.usc.edu

Director: Peter C. Mancall
Associate Director: Amy Braden
Research Assistant: Karin Amundsen

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