22 Oct: Ecclesiastical Approval and Use of Judicial Torture in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Ecclesiastical Approval and Use of Judicial Torture in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

HENRY ANSGAR KELLY
Distinguished Research Professor
UCLA Department of English
You are invited to attend the next CMRS Roundtable on

Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Royce 306 at 12:00 pm

It is widely thought by Church historians, even experts in medieval canon law that the early Church disapproved of torture and disallowed it in court proceedings, whether secular or ecclesiastical. They base this view on a statement made by Gratian in his Decretum (ca. 1140), but Gratian here refers only to extrajudicial extortion. He most certainly allows and prescribes the use of torture by judges in specific circumstances.  His doctrine was inherited by heresy inquisitors and was maintained through the sixteenth century, with a dramatic further twist in good time for Galileo’s trial in 1632. Professor Kelly will reference and demonstrate the online version of the Corpus Juris Canonici hosted by UCLA Library.

CMRS@HUMNET.UCLA.EDU    |    310-825-1880    |    WWW.CMRS.UCLA.EDU

Advance Registration is not required. Please sign the attendance sheet at the door. No fee.  Seating is limited, available on a first-come, first-served basis. Use the Self Pay Parking in UCLA Lots 2, 3, 4,or 5.

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