Feb 13-14 Conference: “Touching Shakespeare: Proximity, Precarity, and Resilience in Renaissance Drama and Modern Life”

“Touching Shakespeare: Proximity, Precarity, and Resilience in Renaissance Drama and Modern Life”

Friday-Saturday, Feb. 13-14, 2015
UCLA Royce Hall Room 314

http://cmrs.ucla.edu/programs/conference_shakespeare_feb2015.html

Touch, sensing, and sensation are lively topics in the humanities right now.  Touch intimates physical proximity and calls to mind the vulnerable body and the resilient flesh, even as it also carries tacit knowledge of the deep co-implication of physical and imaginative or intuitive aspects of proximity. The aim of this conference is to expose sensation to an existential and political triad of terms, by supplementing proximity, the emotional calculus of spatial closeness, with precarity—the forms of risk associated with economic, legal, or creaturely disability and interdependence—and with resilience—the responsive adaptation and accommodation to the physical and social environment by which individuals cope with precarity. In Shakespearean drama, the triad of proximity, precarity, and resilience concerns more than the on-going task of building sustainable relations between humans; it also entails recognition of the co-participation of human and nonhuman actors in the making of a habitable world. The plays of Shakespeare are documents of survival, prompts for improvisation, and exercises in pattern recognition with the capacity not only to inform us about the prior histories of proximity, precarity and resilience in relation to the senses, but also to aid us in our ongoing efforts to inhabit the spaces shaped by human effort, technological complexity, and environmental vulnerability today.

This symposium was organized by Lowell Gallagher (UCLA), Julia Reinhard Lupton (UC Irvine, and James Kearney (UC Santa Barbara).

Friday, February 13, 2015
UCLA Royce Hall, Room 314
1:00 pm Registration, Coffee
1:30 Welcoming Remarks:
Massimo Ciavolella (UCLA), CMRS  Director
Lowell Gallagher (UCLA)
Julia Reinhard Lupton (UC Irvine)
2:00 W. B. Worthen (Barnard College)
“Remediating OP; or, ‘Shakespeare You Can Throw Beer At’”
Moderator: Ian Munro (UC Irvine)
2:45 Break
3:00 David Glimp (University of Colorado at Boulder)
“‘Quod Omnes Tangit’: Taxes and the Sense of the Strange in Shakespeare’s
King John
Moderator: Matthew Smith (Azusa Pacific University)
3:45 Break
4:00 Julian Yates (University of Delaware)
“Counting Sheep in the Belly of the Wolf”
Moderator: Andrew Griffin (UC Santa Barbara)
4:45 Wrap-up remarks for the day
Saturday, February 14, 2015
Royce Hall, Room 314
9:30 am Coffee, Pastries
9:45 Opening remarks: James Kearney (UC Santa Barbara)
10:00 Aranye Fradenburg (UC Santa Barbara)
“Distributed Cognition in Shakespeare’s Sonnets”
Moderator: Kent Lehnhof (Chapman University)
10:45 Break
11:00 Allison Deutermann (CUNY)
“How to Hear the ‘fatal screech-owl’: Resilient Listening in 3 Henry VI
Moderator: Arvind Thomas (UCLA)
11:45 Lunch Break
1:00 pm Laurie Shannon (Northwestern University)
“Hamlet’s Kindness”
Moderator: Robert Watson (UCLA)
1:45 Break
2:00 Roundtable Discussion: Sara Burdorff (UCLA); Peter Cibula (UC Irvine); Chris Dearner (UC Irvine); Christopher Foley (UC Santa Barbara); James Funk (UC Irvine); Kailey Giordano (UC San Diego); Christine Gottlieb (UCLA); Kristen McCants; (UC Santa Barbara); Holly Moyer (UCLA)
3:00 Closing Remarks:
Julia Reinhard Lupton (UC Irvine)
Support for this program provided by UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Co-sponsorsed by UCLA Department of English, UCLA Friends of English, and UCI Group for the Study of Early Cultures.

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